It was once a common practice to conceal shoes in the structure of a building to ward off evil spirits

It’s believed that people as far back as the 14th century thought that concealed shoes would ward off evil spirits and bring good luck. They are often found near chimneys, perhaps because evil spirits would enter through the highest point of the house, as well as near other access points like doors and windows. The shoes are usually well-worn, and are more likely to have belonged to children or women than men.

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Tsutomu Yamaguchi – the Japanese man who survived Hiroshima and Nagasaki

It seems almost improper to suggest that fortune was smiling on Tsutomu Yamaguchi in the dying days of the second world war. He was one of an unknown number of survivors from the Hiroshima bombing had made their way to Nagasaki, where they were bombed again.

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Necropants: The Icelandic Pants of the Dead

Nábrókarstafur, or “Necropants,” is an Icelandic magical stave, or runelike symbol, associated with a pair of pants made from a dead man’s skin. As the Museum of Icelandic Sorcery and Witchcraft cheerfully notes, ”If you want to make your own necropants, you have to get permission from a living man to use his skin after his dead.”

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Ancient Roman coins with sex scenes – sprintia

This is a spintria (plural, spintriae). Some scholars have argued that spintriae were used to pay prostitutes, possibly for use in brothels. Since there were a lot of foreigners coming to the city that did not speak the language and most of the prostitutes were slaves captured from other places the coins made the transactions easy and efficient. One side of these coins showed what the buyer wanted and the other showed the amount of money to be paid for the act. There is no direct ancient evidence, however, to support the theory that spintriae were created as tokens for exchange in place of official coinage.

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Chicken called Mike lived for 2 years without a head

Bob Landry—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images  Mike the headless chicken, October 1945. According to some accounts, the day the ax fell, Mike slept with his head under his wing.
Bob Landry—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images
Mike the headless chicken, October 1945. According to some accounts, the day the ax fell, Mike slept with his head under his wing.

September 10th, 1945 finds a strapping (but tender) five and a half month old Wyandotte rooster pecking through the dust of Fruita, Colorado. The unsuspecting bird had never looked so delicious as he did that, now famous, day. Clara Olsen was planning on featuring the plump chicken in the evening meal. Husband Lloyd Olsen was sent out, on a very routine mission, to prepare the designated fryer for the pan. Nothing about this task turned out to be routine. Lloyd knew his Mother in Law would be dining with them and would savor the neck. He positioned his ax precisely, estimating just the right tolerances, to leave a generous neck bone. “It was as important to Suck-Up to your Mother in Law in the 40’s as it is today.” A skillful blow was executed and the chicken staggered around like most freshly terminated poultry.

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In ancient Mesoamerica, mirrors were fashioned from stone and were regarded as portals to a supernatural realm

The use of mirrors in Mesoamerican culture was associated with the idea that they served as portals to a realm that could be seen but not interacted with. Mirrors in pre-Columbian Mesoamerica were fashioned from stone and served a number of uses, from the decorative to the divinatory.

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