A rare deep-sea anglerfish is caught on video for the first time

A rare black seadevil was captured for the first time on video in Monterey Canyon, and it’s a weird creature. The canyon plunges to a depth of nearly 3 miles — or 14,763 feet. The creature was caught alive on camera at about 1,900 feet. The fish, also known as a deep-sea anglerfish, is about 3.5 inches long. They die when brought to the surface. Anglerfish don’t have a swim bladder, so, unlike some other deep-sea animals, they won’t have all of their organs pushed out of their mouth when they’re brought up. The difference in pressure (and temperature, amongst other things) still kills them.

– via latimes.com

25 Billboards with Interesting Science Facts

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Science World is a not-for-profit organization dedicated spreading the wonder of science for kids and adults alike.

In collaboration with their long-term advertising agency partners Rethink, Science World are well known in Canada for their award-winning outdoor and ambient media campaigns. From billboards and bus shelters to product placements, Science World campaigns are popular in Vancouver for their quirky content and unusual presentation.

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The Science Behind Out Of Body Experiences

Significantly activated regions of the brain while the participant was having extra-corporeal experiences. Most significantly activated regions are lateralized to the left side and include the supplementary motor area (F), the cerebellum (B,D,E), the supramarginal gyrus (D,F), the inferior temporal gyrus (B,D,F), the middle and superior orbitofrontal gyri (A,C,D,E).
Significantly activated regions of the brain while the participant was having extra-corporeal experiences. Most significantly activated regions are lateralized to the left side and include the supplementary motor area (F), the cerebellum (B,D,E), the supramarginal gyrus (D,F), the inferior temporal gyrus (B,D,F), the middle and superior orbitofrontal gyri (A,C,D,E).

Many people claim that they have experienced out-of-body experiences also known as “astral projection”, “soul travel”, or “spirit walking” — floating outside of their bodies and watching themselves from the outside. Some parapsychologists and occult writers treat out-of-body experiences as evidence that a soul, spirit or subtle body can detach itself from the body and visit distant locations. One in ten people have an out-of-body experience once, or even, several times in their life. A team of scientists found someone who says she can do this at will and put her into a brain scanner. What they discovered was very interesting.

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The Mini Museum: A Collection of Oddities

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For over three decades designer Hans Fex has been collecting the Earth’s most unusual historical samples such as: coal from the Titanic, a fossil of a palm tree from Antarctica, dinosaur bones, wrap from a mummy and even a piece of the Apollo 11 command module. Working with specialists recommended by museum curators, research scientists and university historians, he has now gathered 33 artifacts that he’s broken down into tiny pieces and inserted into translucent case. He calls it the Mini Museum.

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One in Four Americans is Unaware that Earth Orbits the Sun

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The National Science Foundation (NSF) published an unexpected poll result: around 25 percent of Americans don’t know that the Earth orbits the sun. Perhaps this is just an anomaly; a statistical error? However, another outcome of the same poll appeared recently concluded that the majority of young Americans think astrology is a science.

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Crocodiles Climb Trees

An American alligator perches on a tree branch in Pearl River Delta, Mississippi.
An American alligator perches on a tree branch in Pearl River Delta, Mississippi.

A University of Tennessee, Knoxville, study has found that the reptiles can climb trees. Study concluded that at least four species of crocodiles climbed trees, but how far up they went varied by their sizes. The smaller ones were able to climb higher and further than the larger ones. Some of them were observed climbing as far as four meters high.

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Mirrors May Cause Hallucinations

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A weird illusion is evoked once you stare at your reflection in a mirror. It’s a famous old Halloween trick that scientists are starting to explore. You can give it a try. Sit in a dark room, about a meter (3 ft) away from a mirror and stare at the reflection of your face for about ten minutes. Keep the room as dark as possible, while still being able to see your reflection.

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Climate maps of Middle Earth

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A scientist created climate maps Of Middle Earth based on Tolkien’s incredibly detailed maps. Dan Lunt works as a climate research scientist at Bristol University in UK. He created a computer model of the climate of Middle-earth from J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings. Writing under the name Radagast the Brown, Dr. Lunt published an article about it. In order to make the article accessible readers in Middle-earth who don’t know English, he published it Elflish and Dwarfish as well as English.

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Hosting the Olympics Is 6-times more expensive than flying a robot to Mars

The $2.5 billion that it cost to launch Curiosity Rover may sounds like a lot, but as the Facebook group “I f**king love science” noted, that’s pocket change compared to the cost of the London Olympics … The group compared Curiosity’s $2.5 billion number from The New York Times and the Olympic’s $15 billion estimate from Forbes in a pie chart. (A pie chart suggests Curiosity and the Olympics were dipping from the same pool of money.)

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A Penny on Mars: US Coin Riding NASA Rover on Red Planet

A penny in today’s economy does not go very far, but that has not stopped NASA from making a 1-cent piece stretch all the way to another planet: Mars. This Lincoln penny is part of a camera calibration target attached to NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity, which successfully landed in Gale Crater on August 6, 2012.

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