Huge Python Eating a Crocodile

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In northern Australia, a snake has won a battle with a crocodile: wrestling it and then finally eating it. An interesting fact is that it’s unlikely that this snake will eat again anytime soon. In order to deal with such a massive meal, snakes of this size remodel their internal organs. Their heart increases in length and their intestines experience massive hypertrophy, to pump out enough digestive enzymes for consumption.

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In Lapland, Finland Reindeer Antlers Glow

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In Lapland, Finland reindeer antlers are sprayed with the light reflector to reduce traffic accidents. Reindeer are not hunted in Finland, but while they roam freely for most of the year, they are owned like cattle. The antlers glow only in car headlights so it’s not like wolves are scanning the forest with searchlights for flashy reindeer. In addition to danger they pose on the roads as they do not fear vehicles, the herders have an economic incentive to keep the stock alive.

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Crocodiles Climb Trees

An American alligator perches on a tree branch in Pearl River Delta, Mississippi.
An American alligator perches on a tree branch in Pearl River Delta, Mississippi.

A University of Tennessee, Knoxville, study has found that the reptiles can climb trees. Study concluded that at least four species of crocodiles climbed trees, but how far up they went varied by their sizes. The smaller ones were able to climb higher and further than the larger ones. Some of them were observed climbing as far as four meters high.

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Dogs understand human perspective

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A recent study reveals that dogs are much likely to steal food in the dark when humans cannot notice them, indicating they understand a human’s perspective. A series of experiments were conducted in different light conditions. In each test, the humans forbade the dog from eating the food. On conducting these tests, she noticed that the dog ate more food in the dark and that too quickly, as compared to when the room was lit.

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Chicken called Mike lived for 2 years without a head

Bob Landry—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images  Mike the headless chicken, October 1945. According to some accounts, the day the ax fell, Mike slept with his head under his wing.
Bob Landry—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images
Mike the headless chicken, October 1945. According to some accounts, the day the ax fell, Mike slept with his head under his wing.

September 10th, 1945 finds a strapping (but tender) five and a half month old Wyandotte rooster pecking through the dust of Fruita, Colorado. The unsuspecting bird had never looked so delicious as he did that, now famous, day. Clara Olsen was planning on featuring the plump chicken in the evening meal. Husband Lloyd Olsen was sent out, on a very routine mission, to prepare the designated fryer for the pan. Nothing about this task turned out to be routine. Lloyd knew his Mother in Law would be dining with them and would savor the neck. He positioned his ax precisely, estimating just the right tolerances, to leave a generous neck bone. “It was as important to Suck-Up to your Mother in Law in the 40’s as it is today.” A skillful blow was executed and the chicken staggered around like most freshly terminated poultry.

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