The Science Behind Out Of Body Experiences

Significantly activated regions of the brain while the participant was having extra-corporeal experiences. Most significantly activated regions are lateralized to the left side and include the supplementary motor area (F), the cerebellum (B,D,E), the supramarginal gyrus (D,F), the inferior temporal gyrus (B,D,F), the middle and superior orbitofrontal gyri (A,C,D,E).
Significantly activated regions of the brain while the participant was having extra-corporeal experiences. Most significantly activated regions are lateralized to the left side and include the supplementary motor area (F), the cerebellum (B,D,E), the supramarginal gyrus (D,F), the inferior temporal gyrus (B,D,F), the middle and superior orbitofrontal gyri (A,C,D,E).

Many people claim that they have experienced out-of-body experiences also known as “astral projection”, “soul travel”, or “spirit walking” — floating outside of their bodies and watching themselves from the outside. Some parapsychologists and occult writers treat out-of-body experiences as evidence that a soul, spirit or subtle body can detach itself from the body and visit distant locations. One in ten people have an out-of-body experience once, or even, several times in their life. A team of scientists found someone who says she can do this at will and put her into a brain scanner. What they discovered was very interesting.

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This may be the weirdest human brain known to science

strange-human-brain-small

This strange picture of a blob is a completely smooth brain of an adult male. It has no ridges and folds so characteristic to the most complex organ of Homo sapiens. Not much known about the possessor of the brain, except that he ended his days in a psychiatric hospital in Texas in 1970.

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Some people have a disorder that allows them to “see” music, numbers and letters as colors

Credit: peacemakergirl.deviantart.com
Credit: peacemakergirl.deviantart.com

Some musicians and composers have a brain disorder that allows them to “see” music as colors or shapes. This sensory disorder is called synesthesia. Mozart is said to have had this condition. He said that the key of D major had a warm “orangey” sound to it, while B-flat minor was blackish. A major was a rainbow of colors to him. This may explain why he wrote some of his music using different colors for different music notes, and why much of his music is in major keys.

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Music is as addictive as sex and drugs

Image Credit: gibranchequer/Flickr

People love music for much the same reason they’re drawn to sex, drugs, gambling and delicious food, according to new research. When you listen to tunes that move you, the study found, your brain releases dopamine, a chemical involved in both motivation and addiction.

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